Mission: Impossible II (2000)

Released: May 24, 2000. Directed by: John Woo. Starring: Tom Cruise, Dougray Scott, Thandie Newton. Runtime: 2h 3 min.

This review contains a few spoilers.

In Mission: Impossible II, Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) is rudely called away from his rock-climbing vacation for a new mission. His mission’s in Sydney, Australia where he must destroy a genetically modified disease called the “Chimera.”

For some of the film, skilled thief Nyah Hall (Thandie Newton) is put in the most danger. She’s an ex-girlfriend of main villain Sean Ambrose (Dougray Scott), a disavowed IMF agent, so she’s called upon to gain his trust. Things get complicated when Ethan also falls for Nyah.

This personal relationship makes it feel like there are more stakes than the first film. It introduces a love triangle dynamic that is interesting from Ethan’s side, but Ambrose is goofy during it. He has an inferiority complex because of the perfect agent Ethan, and he ugly cries when he learns Nyah isn’t loyal to him. I won’t shame guys who cry – I cry at everything – but it’s dumb for this movie.

The writing’s not great, but some dialogue is laughably bad enough to be memorable. Take a gem from Anthony Hopkins’ Mission Commander Swanbeck, for example: “This isn’t mission difficult, it’s mission impossible.” It’s not a bad title for a knockoff film.

Tom Cruise is good again as Ethan, and his long hair looks good as he’s kicking in slow motion. I liked some of the plot itself and the monologue, that’s repeated a few times, about Chimera being the villain and Bellerophon being the hero.

It’s an interesting Greek myth and it’s cool how it’s brought into the story. The story itself doesn’t have a ton of substance other than just trying to destroy a deadly virus, as you can summarize the first hour of the movie about a minute.

Director John Woo tries to distract from that with a lot of slow motion. The entire third act is a lot of Ethan just doing slow-motion kicks. There’s also a whole thing of Ethan shooting a stick bomb to blow in a door and then dramatically walking past the door through the flames, staring at Ambrose.

This silliness made me laugh and was fun, and I think this needed more slow-motion doves. The style of the film in the third act just makes this feel more like a John Woo movie than a Mission: Impossible film. That’s not usually a bad thing – but a lot of this explains why this is considered the weakest of the series.

Score: 50/100

Reviews of other films in the franchise:

Mission: Impossible (1996)

Advertisements

Edge of Tomorrow (2014)

Source: IMDb

Source: IMDb

Released: June 6, 2014. Directed by: Doug Liman. Starring: Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton. Runtime: 1hr., 53 min.

When it comes to summer blockbusters, there are three kinds of anticipation. The ones that muster excitement and they satisfy; the movies that you get excited for but they bring disappointment; and the ones that you don’t have high expectations for, because high-concept science fiction so often just stays that way – a high concept with bad execution. I’m looking at you, Transcendence.

But sometimes, those high-concept movies get great execution and just blow you out of the water, because it actually is good. That’s the category Edge of Tomorrow falls under.

The story follows Major William Cage (Tom Cruise), a man who tries to get out of duty by blackmailing a General (Brendan Gleeson). The General doesn’t like that, and he puts the untrained Cage into battle against an alien race called the Mimic. It’s a day much like D-Day, but this time the baddies have the edge.

When facing sure death, he is able to adopt the power of the Mimics: the ability to restart the day. He is given another shot to win an unbeatable war. To do so, he needs help from the poster girl of awesome soldiers, the Full Metal B**ch herself, Rita Vrataski. She also found herself in a similar situation when she led the victory at the Battle of Verdun. Rita will train Cage in an attempt to win the war, and create the perfect soldier out of him.

This film is a lot smarter than anyone might expect it to be. It handles the time loop effect perfectly in a mildly easy to follow narrative. It weaves in a great sense of humour into the superbly shot and ridiculously fun action sequences. The humour is helped out by Tom Cruise and a great Emily Blunt. Cruise offers a vulnerable, wide-eyed and charismatic performance.

The film’s helped out by great writing by Christopher McQuarrie and the Butterworth brothers, adapting the novel All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka. McQuarrie’s humour is evident in the screenplay.

The films blends a great training movie with fun sequences, and aspects of Groundhog Day – notice the same the female protagonist name, Rita – to form a refreshingly original blockbuster. It’s surprisingly not a repetitive film, as it finds new and creative ways to re-shape every days – even if we’ve seen the dialogue before.

A bothersome aspect is why Cage is forced into combat, when he recruits a few million soldiers for the war as an apparent military marketer. He’s an average guy plunged into a crazy situation, and since he is only experienced in marketing, he has to be trained to win this war. It’s a funny aspect to the narrative.

Also bothersome is how run-of-the-mill the ending feels to the rest of the brilliant picture. Saving it is superb visual effects and a great chemistry from the cast. Even if the ending isn’t perfect, it’s still a film that can be enjoyed repeatedly.

Score: 85/100

[Sort of] Quick Review: In Bruges (2008)

In Bruges

Release Date: February 29, 2008

Director: Martin McDonagh

Stars: Colin Farrell, Brendan Gleeson, Ralph Fiennes

Runtime: 107 min

Tagline: Shoot first. Sightsee later.

Martin McDonagh brings us a great action comedy in his first feature film endeavour.

Colin Farrell portrays a hitman named Ray. Ray is currently in a bad state, because he is guilt-ridden because of a job gone wrong, where he accidentally killed an innocent bystander. He and his partner in crime, Ken (Brendan Gleeson) get put in a small bed and breakfast in Bruges, Belgium. They are told to wait there by their boss, Harry (Ralph Fiennes), who tells them to sightsee and enjoy the scenery. Ken’s all up for it, but it’s not particularly something that interests simple-minded Ray. Once Harry finally gives the job to Ray, he isn’t sure if he can go through with it – and must have an internal fight of morals to make his final decision.

McDonagh has a real knack for making the seemingly worst of people, like in this film hitmen, and turn them into great and fairly likeable character. Ray is likeable, despite his constant pessimism and irritability. In McDonagh’s most recent film, and second feature film, Seven Psychopaths, he makes a set of psychopaths into likeable characters.

His unique character development is great because you can easily get emotionally invested into these colourful characters. Each character is pretty great.

There are quite a few gruesome scenes, but they are pretty fun to watch, especially if gruesome action is your forté. The comedy is pretty great, I was chuckling in a few scenes and was laughing uncontrollably in others. If you do love this sort of gruesome action and McDonagh’s brand of comedy, it’ll sort of be an action-comedy styled Heaven.

Colin Farrell, Brendan Gleeson, Ralph Fiennes, Clémence Poésy, Jérémie Renier, Jordan Prentice, Thekla Reuten, Mark C. Donovan, Zeljko Ivanek, Eric Godon and Rudy Blomme star in this film.

In Bruges is a great cinematic experience that is unique and definitely deserved that Best Original Screenplay nomination. Some of the comedy is really far between, and some scenes aren’t as memorable as others, but that’s really its only flaw. I don’t think I’ll rush back to watching it, but I’m glad I did, because it was pretty fun and had some great characters with great layers.

75/100

Safe House (2012)

Safe House

Release Date: February 10, 2012

Director: Daniel Espinosa

Stars: Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds, Vera Farmiga

Runtime: 115 min

Tagline: No one is safe.

Matt Weston (Ryan Reynolds) is a young CIA agent whose mission is to go to this safe house and look after a fugitive, Tobin Frost (Denzel Washington). Frost used to be a great CIA agent, until he turned rogue. It turns out others want Frost dead, too. After the safe house is attacked, Weston must protect Frost at all costs.

The action sequences are pretty great at the time, but they aren’t very memorable at all. There’s also quite a few boring scenes.  The plot also isn’t all that memorable either, and it can get a little complicated at times – when you’d think a film with such a seemingly simple plot wouldn’t involve any thinking power at all.

The performances are decent, Washington is the best in his role, though. This movie stars Ryan Reynolds, Denzel Washington, Vera Farmiga, Brendan Gleeson, Sam Shepard, Nora Arnezeder, Robert Patrick and Joel Kinnaman.

What you get is an action film I could live without, but I enjoyed quite a few aspects of it. Nothing I regret seeing but it just left a feeling of “that could have been so much better,” by the end of the running time. It isn’t a total waste of time as some of it’s interesting, see it if the opportunity comes along; as some of it has some good action and isn’t a complete fail of a film.

I was generally disappointed by this really decent action flick that could have been greater, considering it has seemingly such a simple plot and a great cast, but ended up being unfortunately between average and pretty good.

63/100