V/H/S (2012)

VHSReleased: September 6, 2012. Directed by: Various (including Ti West, Adam Wingard). Starring: Adam Wingard, Joe Swanberg, Helen Rogers. Runtime: 116 min.

V/H/S is a found-footage anthology film featuring five main short films built around a frame narrative, that also works as its own short film experienced in snippets. As with most found-footage films, the cinematography is all over the place, but at least the shaky cam shots are well-edited. How the filmmakers make an excuse for taking the found-footage approach, meaning the reason why the characters are using hand-held cameras, are unique. In one segment, the story is shown from a main character’s glasses that have a hidden camera in them; in others they’re just documenting experiences; and one uses a Skype approach.

I’ll tell you a bit about each segment answering if they’re scary or not, but I’ll try not to spoil too much – it’s just the basics, really. The film opens with a gang of unlikable hoodlums wreaking havoc upon unsuspecting citizens and ugly old buildings. They are tasked by an unknown third party to enter a house and recover a rare VHS tape (apparently we’re living in the 1990s), but in order to find the correct one they have to watch the footage on the tapes, because there’s unfortunately no title on any of them saying “It’s this one!” This segment is the one experienced in short snippets; it’s not very interesting or scary, but having a frame narrative is better than not having one at all, because it gives the appearance that the film is more focused.

Onto the segment that made me scream like a little schoolgirl at a drive-in. Well, not really, but I did have to turn it off three times and catch my cool the first time I tried watching this film. This segment, called “Amateur Night,” follows a group of teens who go out to a party to pick up women. The main guy named Shane has the glasses that captures everything on video. It seems to me that he is doing it so he can either watch his sex film for his personal pleasure or just sell it if she’s hot enough, or just post it on the internet. These guys are simply a bunch of drunk college kids trying to get lucky, but the point-of-view is intriguing. The plot basically teaches me that I shouldn’t pick up women from bars who have strange feet or only say “I like you.” Kudos to the actress and the special effects in this segment. This segment is awesome and truly scary (in my eyes, at least), but I doubt I’ll re-watch it because it’s really too freaky for me and experiencing it twice is enough. Definitely one of the best segments and a really good fifteen minutes (estimated) of cinema.

The second segment is called “Second Honeymoon” and is directed by Ti West. This one is a simple short with a boring build-up, okay characters, an awkward chemistry and no great pay-off. It’s not very smart and West largely handles this dully and it’s not scary at all. The only other works by West I’m familiar with are his awful short segment in The ABCs of Death, the god-awful Cabin Fever 2: Spring Fever (I should review that soon), and his great film that premiered at TIFF in September, The Sacrament. Apparently he’s not good at directing or writing shorts at all, because this one isn’t impressive.

The third segment is a mysterious one called “Tuesday the 17th”; it’s gory and fun and seems to promise a simple camping getaway premise. The foreshadowing is well done, leading up to an okay pay-off. The execution by writer/director Glenn McQuaid is pretty good. It’s about as scary as a regular slasher flick, which is to say it’s more thrilling then terrifying.

v_h_s-06The fourth segment is my favourite. It’s freaky and ultimately quite scary. It’s not as scary as the first segment, but it’s entertaining and has an interesting ending. It’s effective during its brief runtime. I like the camera angles, too, where the webcam films whatever is happening – and there are two cameras, one capturing what’s happening on Emily’s side, and what is happening on her boyfriend’s side (as pictured above). Kudos to the Emily character (portrayed by Helen Rogers) for staying in a creepy and potentially haunted apartment for so long. Rogers is a cute actress who captures paranoia well; and she strikes me as an older-looking and brunette version of Chloë Grace Moretz.

The final segment is a haunted house premise (like the  previous segment), where a few party animals walk into a house where a party is supposed to be happening. Craziness follows and I think the execution is pretty good. It doesn’t make the most sense or gets fully explained, but it’s creative. Some static in the cinematography adds an unsettling layer. It’s at least much scarier than Ti West’s attempt.

When I like four out of six segments, I think it’s a mild success. This is largely an experimental film, and while the cinematography is overall weak, it’s an enjoyable horror experience. Another weak aspect are the characters who really suck, but keep in mind there’s no time for development because of the limited time for each segment. The segments range from not scary at all to very scary, but I think there’s at least one or two segments most horror fans will like; besides, if you don’t like one segment, you might like the next.

Score60/100

Question: What was your favourite segment?

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Kick-Ass 2 (2013)

Kick-Ass 2Released: August 16, 2013. Directed by: Jeff Wadlow. Starring: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloë Grace Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. Runtime: 103 min.

“Kick-Ass 2” takes place three years after the first. Mindy McCready (Chloë Grace Moretz) is now 15 years old, and she’s hung up her Hit-Girl costume. Dave (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) has also hung up his Kick-Ass costume, but he is bored without midnighting as Kick-Ass. Mindy begins to help train him and get him in back in shape for crime fighting. Eventually, Mindy can’t take part in the training anymore because she has to honour her promise (of not fighting crime) to Marcus (Morris Chestnut). Kick-Ass finds a team called Justice Forever because he knows he can’t fight crime by himself. Meanwhile, Chris D’Amico (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) wants Kick-Ass to pay for what he did to his father. He is reborn as The Mother F!*#@r and plans to become the world’s first super villain. His act of revenge will begin to affect everyone Kick-Ass knows.

This isn’t in the same league as the original. “Kick-Ass 2” is a super good sequel, while its predecessor achieves cult classic status. The movie is immensely enjoyable and I’ll probably re-watch it many times, but I thought I’d get that off my chest. I have a few minor complaints about it.

Replacing core cast/crew members never isn’t beneficial. It’s not as if Kick-Ass or Hit-Girl are recast, but two supporting actors get replaced. I’m sure I wasn’t the only one to notice. Todd, Dave’s buddy, is recast, because Evan Peters had scheduling conflicts; and the ideal chemistry between the friend group (with Johnson, Clark Duke and Peters) is absent. The replacement that is the most noticeable is Mindy’s guardian, Marcus. Omari Hardwick portrayed him in the first, and now it’s Morris Chestnut. Chestnut is the better-known actor, but I already like the guy – so it would have been nice to see Hardwick reprise the role. If Hardwick was replaced by Idris Elba or Djimon Hounsou, I wouldn’t complain.

Matthew Vaughn’s (credited as producer) absence as director and co-writer hurts the film. Jeff Wadlow directs and adapts this from Mark Millar’s comic book. He isn’t bad, but to paraphrase Hit-Girl about she and Kick-Ass, “Vaughn is in the NFL and Wadlow is in Pee-Wee.” Without Vaughn’s directorial vision, much of the visual style (and charm) of the first is absent. (A true testament to the fact that the right director and cinematographer, Ben Davis gets replaced, will go a long way.) That warehouse scene in “Kick-Ass” where Hit-Girl goes on a solo rescue mission might be enough to give an epileptic a major seizure, but boy is it beautifully done.

The isn’t a train wreck without Vaughn’s direction by any means, but his direction would have helped. The film lacks the same satirical edge of the first. It’s very much a satire, and an amusing one, but it doesn’t have the same awesome edge. (Who else thought the Union J band that Mindy watches a video of was a parody of boy bands? I was surprised to find out that they’re real.) This movie still is enjoyable.

The action is tongue-in-cheek, over-the-top gleeful fun. That’s what we expect. I’m surprised by the movie’s restraint at one point, since the film generally practices excessiveness. A potentially disturbing rape scene is turned into a comedic scene, and I think it’s handled well. The movie has a few brief streaks of meanness and cruelty. However, it’s a minor complaint, because they aren’t arbitary; it advances the story in some way, and it’s easier to excuse.

Now, for the characters. Johnson has a charm about him that gets Kick-Ass the ladies. He loses Katie Deauxma (Lyndsy Fonseca) early on, because of something that’s easy to explain. He must have been planning on breaking up with her soon because he doesn’t chase after her, the break-up doesn’t bother him, and then the movie forgets about her immediately. Kick-Ass finds a superhero group called Justice Forever. His new love interest is the sexy superhero called Night Bitch (Lindy Booth), and I think N.B. is a name better suited for a super villain, not a hero. Kick-Ass is trying desperately to find a group, and I can’t decide if he’s smart or stupid. He’s smart because he knows he’ll get his ass kicked alone; but he must be stupid to trust people so easily after all that went down with making the mistake of trusting Red Mist/Chris D’Amico.

Justice Forever is led by Colonel Stars and Stripes (a scene-stealing Jim Carrey). He rivals Dwayne Johnson’s Paul Doyle of “Pain and Gain” as 2013’s most likable born-again Christian. Carrey is hilarious in a supporting yet critical role, as he feels like a main symbol of justice. A bit of irony: Colonel is always telling people to watch their language, yet he lets a superhero named Night Bitch be on his team. Dr. Gravity (Donald Faison) is one of the best additions to Justice Forever. A main theme of the movie is that, since the film is set in the real world, the real world brings real consequences, which brings about a theme of good doesn’t always conquer evil. Keep in mind, though: Bringing about thought-provoking themes isn’t a main focus.

Mindy’s arc is traditional. Her everyday persona is a bit more prevalent than her badass midnighting hero. But it’s great when Hit-Girl shows up. She puts all other powerless superheroes (in this universe) to shame. Moretz picks great roles, tackling them with a confidence, but her hard work is evident. Back to Mindy’s arc. It’s a traditional arc where she tries to enjoy high school and the things that come with it. She has a run-in with mean girls (led by Claudia Lee), and the spectacular and hysterical way Mindy handles them makes it an ordinary arc, with an extraordinary pay-off. Even if it’s played for gross-out laughs.

The film’s villains are grand. Christopher Mintz-Plasse has what it takes to tackle this role, and he doesn’t disappoint. He’s pretty crazy in 2011’s “Fright Night.” He’s crazy and funny here, too. I like how he goes against type because in his film debut six years ago in “Superbad” he was on the receiving end of a liquour store robbery, but now he’s the one briefly robbing a convenience store. One thing I’ve never understood about the character: I know he could have put two and two together, by how is he 100% certain his father was shot by a bazooka? He was unconscious in the other room, there were no witnesses, and the body couldn’t really be found easily if it’s blown to smithereens.

Despite my complaints, the movie’s a blast. I might not have laughed as much as the audience I saw it with (they were laughing at everything at some points), but I did laugh quite a lot. It’s a memorable action comedy that has some gleefully fun action scenes, a quickly-paced plot and badass powerless superheroes. This is my favourite superhero movie of the year. If you liked the first, odds are, you’ll like this one. And this is even more true: If you hated the first, you’ll despise this one. To me, it’s a super good sequel.

Score77/100

Kick-Ass (2010)

Kick-AssReleased: April 16, 2010. Directed by: Matthew Vaughn. Starring: Aaron Johnson, Nicolas Cage, Chloë Grace Moretz. Runtime: 117 min.

The superhero niche genre is a prominent one in Hollywood these days. Whether it follows a big name hero like Batman or Superman, or if it’s a critical disaster like something akin to “Green Lantern,” they usually make awesome money. It’s always refreshing to see a superhero movie made with a low budget.

The story follows Dave Lizewski (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) who wonders one day, why has no one ever decided to become a super hero? He’s an unnoticed student and comic book fan who buys a suit and becomes a super hero, even though he is powerless, has no preliminary training or any true reason to do so.

“Kick-Ass” makes me happy for the future of R-rated super hero movies. This has a satirical edge and meta way about it. I love all the homages to super hero movies and the general universe comic books create. I think people who read comic books can respect it a bit more, but this is such an entertaining piece of cinema. The action sequences are tons of fun, and the comedy is just as impressive. The characters are colourful and this is probably my favourite movie based on a comic book. It gives audiences an interesting look into the world of super heroes without any powers. It does raise the question: Why hasn’t anyone put on the cape before and fought crime?

Probably because they’d get their asses kicked. And when they begin to be threatened by the mafia, things don’t get better – they get worse, obviously. That is thanks to Big Daddy (Nicolas Cage) and Hit Girl (Chloë Grace Moretz) who are planning a revenge plot on mob boss Frank D’Amico (Mark Strong), after D’Amico framed Big Daddy, former police officer, and put him in jail for a very long time. (Hit Girl is going along with it because those are the values she was taught. This might disturb some audience members.)

The action is deriously entertaining. Director Matthew Vaughn balances the satirical humour with dark violence, that wouldn’t feel out of place in a Quentin Tarantino picture. One particular scene is hard on the eyes – but so well-done, and it’s a testament to the movie’s visual style and charm. This is a memorable experience, with a great cast.

Nicolas Cage was practically born to play the role of Big Daddy, a darker version of Batman. Some might question a little girl playing the role of a vulgar killing machine, but she (Moretz as Hit Girl) gets some of the biggest laughs and is included in some of the coolest sequences. Moretz has a great career ahead of her. Lyndsey Fonseca is there to up the sexiness of the movie. The film’s finale is astounding and the entertainment rarely dies down throughout. Blood and gore hardly looked so nice in a super hero flick. Vaughn expertly balances the action and the comedy, and I can’t decide which is better.

You care about the characters. The universe created here is magnificent. Aaron Tayl0r-Johnson fits the character of Dave well because, initially, he’s a huge geek. We get to see his process of becoming a character that can really kick ass without the help of spider bites or fancy gadgets. With no power comes no responsibility.

Action, crime, comedy, great characterization, blood, superheroes. This movie’s got it all.

Score95/100

Movie 43 (2013)

Movie 43Movie 43

Release Date: January 25, 2013

Directors: Elizabeth Banks, Steven Brill, Peter Farrelly (and 10 others)

Stars: Liev Schreiber, Emma, Stone, Richard Gere

Runtime: 94 min

I just watched a version online, and I believe it was the version released in the U.K.; it’s an alternate plot to the U.S. version that doesn’t have Dennis Quaid pitching crazy ideas to a studio. I was not going to spend money on this.

Movie 43 is a haphazardly edited sketch comedy that stars as many A-list actors (including Emma Stone, Richard Gere, Kate Bosworth, Liev Schreiber, Naomi Watts, Justin Long, Kristen Bell, and Elizabeth Banks, to name a few) as the filmmakers could convince that this movie would be lots of fun to make. Charles Wessler achieves his vision: A satire that brings up common issues in the most offensive of ways, and it is the most outrageous comedy ever made.

But it is also one awful movie. If only his passion project (an idea that he’s had for over a decade) wasn’t so silly. Saturday Night Live has okay sketches, good sketches and those rare great sketches. This, however, has awful sketches, bad sketches, and just tolerable, but kind-of funny sketches. Even if you do laugh at some points, it doesn’t stop this from being one bad, bad film. This is still sort-of imaginative and quite original, and unlike anything you’ve seen at the movie theatre before. It’s one of those times where too many cooks in the kitchen (13 directors, a huge cast, 30 writers) really spoils the broth. Apparently, it takes thirteen directors, 102 credited cast members and thirty writers to make a really bad film.

The plot follows three adolescent boys who are searching the depths of the internet for Movie 43, the world’s most banned feature. The two older teens who tell a younger brother, the incredibly irritating Baxter who looks like he’s really ten years old, about Movie 43 are really just making it up because they want some April Fool’s revenge. Little do they know is that the video could very well end the world, somehow.

That makes absolutely no sense whatsoever, nor is it explained. It’s completely random and idiotic. This backstory manages to be worse than some of the comedy sketches, to a point where you might actually want to see another bad sketch. This is because the actors in the background story have little to no charisma, and they’re increasingly annoying and bland.

While the idea of sketch comedies in movies is fairly new, this is still trash. The plot is almost as disorganized as every spoof movie out there. If this is compared to Scary Movie 5, this might as well be an Oscar contender. This is definitely not for the easily offended. The humour is thoroughly crude, offensive, absurd, violent, vulgar, inane, insane, sophomoric and rarely funny; but it’s ironic that I’ve seen a lot more nudity in less offensive films. So… Humour that will offend almost the entire world is okay, but extreme nudity is off the table? Hmm.

Out of the movie’s thirteen comedy sketches, there are thirteen stupid and fairly offensive ones. The one with Terrence Howard is hardly funny at all. The sketch showing that people get much too angry with machines and it upsets the kids inside the machines is incredibly stupid, but it’s creative. There are arguably five tolerable ones, but there are none that provide consistent laughs. The ‘Super Hero Dating’ segment with Jason Sudeikis and Justin Long has a few solid jokes, and it’s an imaginative look into the culture of super hero impersonators. It’s the movie’s strongest segment (even if it’s hardly great). The ‘Happy Birthday’ segment with Seann William Scott and Johnny Knoxville also has some good laughs (albeit forgettable), but it is one of the movie’s more violent and vulgar segments. The ‘Truth or Dare’ segment starring Stephen Merchant and Halle Berry is funny in the beginning, but it progressively gets worse until it falls on its face. Suffice to say, the ‘Happy Birthday’ and ‘Super Hero Dating’ sketches are my favourite, and they are somewhat entertaining.

SPOILERS FOLLOW IN THIS FUNNY PARAGRAPH, I briefly describe the film’s worst three sketches. It seems as if the movie is designed to have the worst three sketches at the beginning of the film. The first sketch has Hugh Jackman sporting a pair of testicles under his chin and it is unfunny and unwatchable. It’s a one-joke sketch where it seems as if Kate Winslet’s character is the only one to notice the prominent nuts. Though, it does show that society cannot help but judge someone for the way they look. The second sketch features Liev Schreiber and Naomi Watts homeschooling their child and mercilessly bullying him to a point where he will definitely need to be institutionalized. The third sketch features Anna Farris requesting Chris Pratt to poop on her (you read that right) because it’s apparently a big step in a relationship. Apparently, it’s okay to poop on women, but it’s frowned upon to sh*t on them. Because if you shit on a gal, it’s deemed very offensive. (Read the next part very sarcastically.) Wow. This is the world of my dreams. I’ve always wanted to live in a world where the norm is to poop on women and have a pair of testicles dangling under my chin. Oh, someone, take me there! I can’t take this society where women bitch about me even farting in their general direction! END OF SPOILERS.

Alas, this movie is awful. (But, I am able to use the word ‘alas’ in one of my reviews.) I’ve seen much worse, but it’s really, really, really, stupid. The laughs are forgettable; but it’s the disturbing sketches that are unforgettable. Much to my dismay, this stuff kind-of just sticks with you… Forever.

30/100

Hugo (2011)

Hugo

Release Date: November 23, 2011Director: Martin ScorseseStars: Asa Butterfield, Chloë Grace Moretz, Ben KingsleyRuntime: 126 min.

Hugo is a fantastic film that really sweeps the audience up with its charm, lavish production design, engaging cinematography and thoroughly impressive visuals. One great thing about this is that it isn’t only a marvelous piece of cinema, eye candy or a great film of technical achievements, but it’s a fairly simple and emotional mystery that is easy to follow, but it also gives something special for us film buffs and older audiences alike.

Film buffs might have the mystery figured out by the time they understand who a primary character is, but it doesn’t mean it won’t be a compelling watch. There’s some real emotion in the concept of being forgotten, as we all we want to be respected in some way and we know what it’s like to be neglected at some point. In this way, we can really relate to some of the characters. Hugo also knows what it’s like to be alone as he as an orphan, and it’s really something more most can relate to.

The antagonist, a train inspector portrayed by Sacha Baron Cohen, is also very funny, and he has an extra real layer, because he has one bad leg and he knows what it’s like to be an outcast. His character might as well just be called the Orphan catcher. Cohen has proven to be a versatile performer, as he voices a King lemur in the animated Madagascar series; he has taken on roles in musicals like Sweeney Todd and Les Misérables; while he still plays his signature characters of a flamboyant Austrian trying to make his way in the film industry (Bruno), an Anti-semetic foreigner (Borat) and his most recent character of General Aladeen in The Dictator. He’s really a rare and great talent, if you can get past his tendency to always show frontal nudity. Ben Kingsley also offers a great performance, as do the young actors, Chloë Grace Moretz and Asa Butterfield.

Hugo is Martin Scorsese’s ode to film. It’s also a great ode to one of the greatest pioneers of the film industry (watch the film and find out who!), all wrapped up in a magnificent family adventure that is truly delightful and one of the finest films of 2011. It’s a must-see for cinephiles everywhere, and it’s a visual treat for the whole family.

Score91/100

Dark Shadows (2012)

Dark Shadows

Release Date: May 11, 2012

Director: Tim Burton

Stars: Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Eva Green

Runtime: 113 min

Tagline: Every family has its demons

It’s the year 1752, and Barnabas Collins (Johnny Depp) and his family had just set sail to America, in search of a greater life. Though, they could not escape the mysterious curse that was placed upon his family. Skip two decades, to where Barnabas is the head of Collinwood Manor, but he makes the mistake of breaking the heart of Angelique Bouchard (Eva Green), a maid who’s really a witch. When Barnabas would not love her in return, she placed a curse upon him to turn into a vampire when he dies, so he will have to live for eternity, knowing that his one true love is dead. Skip two centuries, and Barnabas is just waking up from his dirt nap after being trapped inside of a coffin. He makes his way back to Collinwood Manor, and he offers a little support to his descendants, while Angelique still roams the earth…

Dark Shadows is based on a late 60s to early 70s TV show of the same name. This is also the eighth Tim Burton-Johnny Depp vehicle, and it isn’t very good. The Burton-Depp team has brought us great films like Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood, Sleepy Hollow and Sweeney Todd; but they have also brought us bad films like the just okay Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the apparently disappointing Alice in Wonderland. Can you figure out which side it belongs on? It belongs on the bad side. If Shadows were to stand on its own two feet, it isn’t impressive or groundbreaking at all, and if it were to stand with the seven other Burton-Depp vehicles, it would just be awful. Burton has been known for his dark material in films and that signature over-the-topness, and this one is certainly over-the-top, but not in a very good way.

It tries to be funny, and fails. It tries to be fantastic, and fails. There are only one or two pretty good jokes, but the majority of them are big misses. There are some scenes that were meant to be action packed, but they felt really quite boring. They were over the top, but not in the great way we want Burton’s flicks to be. It feels more like a newcomer to the directing game who is experimenting with his options.

The whole vampire love story is getting so old, it’s just about been sucked to death (and brought back to life five times) by the Twilight series. It’s certainly better than the Twilight series, but not by a whole lot. There are some pleasant twists thrown at the audience, that some viewers will like, but most may say, “That’s so ridiculous, I should have saw that one coming.” The story is just a bit too uninteresting to carry itself well enough throughout the entire 113 minutes. It was a giant chore to watch. The acting is okay, and really the only interesting characters are Barnabas (Depp), David (Gulliver McGrath) and Carolyn (Chloe Grace Moretz). The cast is certainly attractive, but some of them don’t offer their usual chops to the table (excluding Depp and Moretz, the rest are just average).

Dark Shadows has a pretty uninteresting plot and a vampire premise that has highly been worn out, only a few likeable characters that can be counted on one hand, and a generally boring endeavour from the Burton/Depp union.

40/100

Let Me In – Quite the remake of a great Swedish film.

Let Me In

Release Date: October 1, 2010

Director: Matt Reeves

Stars: Kodi Smit-McPhee, Chloë Grace Moretz, Richard Jenkins

Runtime: 116 min

Tagline: Innocence dies. Abby doesn’t.

 Let Me In is a remake of the 2008 Swedish film Let the Right One In, and is based on the Swedish novel, Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist.

Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee) is a lonely twelve-year old boy, with a wicked sense of voyeurism, and has been constantly bullied at school. When a mysterious girl, Abby (Chloë Moretz), and her father (Richard Jenkins) move in next door to him, he hopes he has the chance to find a companion in her. Abby’s no ordinary girl, though; the cold doesn’t seem to phase her, and she even walks around in the snow in her bare feet. Also, coinciding with the sudden appearance of this young and mysterious supposed twelve-year old girl, are a string of mysterious murders that are believed to be a cult thing, where the victim’s blood is drained and taken. Owen may find courage he’s been looking for in this small, but ever-so strong, girl. All the while, a police investigator (Elias Koteas) is getting close on the case, but what he doesn’t know is that he’s actually hunting a savage young vampire.

This remake is a worthy substitute for a great foreign horror film. While it does seem to lack some of the emotional appeal as the original, it is fairly well done – and the wintery Sweden location is well relocated to a winter in New Mexico.

Rather than the original, it seems like it tried much harder to be a horror film, rather than a more emotional ride with many horrific elements.

Chloë Grace Moretz really does deliver a great performance, especially for such a young actress. I did prefer it [her performance] rather than that of the young girl from the original film. The film lacks the same great atmospheric style as the original, unfortunately. It isn’t nearly as well directed, but a comparison between Matt Reeves (Cloverfield) and Tomas Alfredson (Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) isn’t exactly fair. This remake does jump into the story much quicker than the original though, and I liked it for that.

Comparisons aside: Standing alone, it offers a fairly good experience that is one of my favourite vampire flicks. The cast does a great job and the film can be quite twisted and some of the themes are pretty interesting.

Both Owen and Abby are monsters on their own terms, but Owen is too weak to stand up for himself – and must learn lessons from Abby.

The climactic scene is pretty good, but not amazing. The atmosphere is pretty stylish, and can offer a unique experience for those of you [strictly] mainstreamers. It is a film worth checking out.

This film stars Kodi Smit-McPhee, Chloë Grace Moretz as the real show stealer Abby, Richard Jenkins, Elias Koteas as the Policeman (and as the voice of Owen’s Father) and the voice and some body of (I say that because the woman’s face is actually never shown) of Cara Buono as Owen’s Mother.

Let Me In is a worthy substitution of a great Swedish film. It lacks the same great atmosphere and emotional appeal as the original, and goes more for the scares, but is an interesting and well-paced film that offers a good and memorable experience.  

75/100

– Daniel Prinn