Deadpool (2016)

 

Released: February 12, 2016. Directed by: Tim Miller. Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, Ed Skrein. Runtime: 1hr, 48 min.

The wait for the man in the red suit is finally over. It’s not Santa Claus – but the merc with a mouth himself, Deadpool. And it’s everything I’ve dreamed a Deadpool movie would be.

It’s fun and consistently entertaining. The strong pacing and the film’s fourth-wall breaking enables smooth transitions in the well-written screenplay. As a bonus, it’s heartfelt.

It’s an R-rated dream, challenging the likes of Kick-Ass and The Punisher as one of the most violent super hero films. Though, Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) is more like a super vigilante.

Wade Wilson was Special Forces before he became Deadpool, signing up for treatment that’s said to cure his cancer. It turned him into an ugly, super human, immortal ass-kicking machine, which led him to leave his girlfriend Vanessa (Morena Baccarin) in heartbreaking nature.

I was hooked from the film’s opening credits – a flipped car frozen in motion, as the camera takes us through a variety of items. The clever film induces big laughs in the most violent situations. The movie and violence work because of its over-the-top nature, and director Tim Miller really makes the humour hit in his directorial debut.

Colossus, Deadpool

Deadpool, Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead in Deadpool. (Source)

The way the non-linear storyline weaves throughout the present and how Wilson became super is an intriguing style for a super hero film, which meets a balls-to-the-wall revenge tale.

Wilson has pledged revenge on Francis (Ed Skrein, The Transporter Refueled), who is responsible for the way Wade looks. Which, as the amusing T.J. Miller’s character Weasel describes, it’s like “Freddy Krueger face-f**ked a topographical map of Utah.”

Francis, whose villain name Ajax is more threatening, is a strong villain. He’s as sadistic as he is unrelenting. His power is a curse – where the super serum that Wade was put through turned Francis into someone who could not feel pain.

His right-hand woman is Angel Dust, a villain with super strength portrayed by former MMA fighter Gina Carano. She’s kick-ass, even though she can’t act her way out of a paper bag. For me, she’s the film’s biggest flaw.

Deadpool

Ryan Reynolds as Deadpool (Source)

Wade enlists two X-Men to take down the baddies. One is Colossus (voiced by Stefan Kapicic), an iron man with super strength; and the other is a trainee called Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand). She has explosive powers, and is described as a “moody teenager” in Wade’s amusing vision of opening credits.

Deadpool’s great self-referential humour featuring digs at X-Men Origins: Wolverine and Green Lantern make this a winner. It also feels so fresh and unique.

Even when it falls into a standard hero versus villain battle at the end, the humour and ambition add a fresh spin. The pure beauty of the film is Wade Wilson and how well Ryan Reynolds does as the character.

His comedic timing fits the badass character as well as the red suit fits him. Reynolds’ ability to act so effectively with his voice brings an energetic aspect to the performance, and he seems to be picking his roles better since his entertaining turn in The Voices. It seems like a promise for better things for Reynolds.

He knows he isn’t a hero and he just does his thing and it’s awesome. The hero is harshly judged and his ugliness gives him a vulnerable layer that makes him relatable. The memorable action scenes and soundtrack complement the mood so well, which is the cherry on top on this glorious movie.

4.5 out of 5 stars

 

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Review: Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)

Source: IMDb

Source: IMDb

Released: August 1, 2014. Directed by: James Gunn. Starring: Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Vin Diesel. Runtime: 2hr., 1 min.

If a time traveller had told me that the writer of Scooby-Doo, James Gunn, would co-write and direct one 2014’s most enjoyable films, I would be hesitant to believe them.

But with co-writer Nicole Perlman, he does so with Guardians of the Galaxy. And it hits a perfect strike in every aspect. The Marvel comic book films’ humour fits this film like a glove.

Its laugh-out-loud funny consistency suits the film’s easy-going tone. The humour is clever and often literal. The simplistic story follows Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), subject of a manhunt after he finds a powerful orb. The orb has caught the eye of Ronan the Accuser (a strong Lee Pace), who is to deliver it to the powerful Thanos.

Ronan, a Kree who takes the beliefs of his people very seriously, has been pillaging planets motivated after his people signed a Peace treaty with the planet Xandar. Djimon Hounsou portrays one of Ronan’s henchmen. His villainous side is fun to watch.

Also on Peter’s tail is Yondu, portrayed by The Walking Dead‘s Michael Rooker, leader of the Ravagers and the man who abducted Peter 26 years ago. His deadly power allows him to control a tiny spear with varying whistles.

Even with the two crews are after him, the film doesn’t feel over-crowded with multiple antagonists. Impressively, this introductory film has great pacing. The characters fit superbly into the Marvel universe, in between the characters of the Avengers group.

I prefer this crew over them, which surprises me because I don’t usually favour these space movies. Peter Quill is a great character and an outlaw who calls himself Star Lord. He’s an average hero with cool gadgets and a great sense of humour.

Chris Pratt brings his charisma and training to the role, after losing sixty pounds to take on the role. There is a familiar character arc with Quill where he has a letter and gift from his late mother that he doesn’t open. Though, he does like music from the 1970’s and 80’s, which enables this to be my favourite soundtrack from 2014.

Gamora, Zoe Saldana, is like a living weapon who works for Ronan. She is also the adopted daughter of Thanos, and her sister, the villainous Nebula, portrayed by Karen Gillan, is badass in her own right.

Rocket Raccoon, voiced by Bradley Cooper who only vaguely sounds like himself, is a bounty hunter driven by money. The character is given poignancy through the fact that he is the only one of his kind – half-machine, half-raccoon, the result of an illegal experiment.

Vin Diesel portrays Raccoon’s best buddy Groot. “I am Groot” is a phrase he regularly says in varying volumes and emotions, actually recording the phrase about one thousand times. Groot is among a species of walking trees who could have just come out of Middle Earth. The quiet character is surprisingly funny. Rocket is like a translator of Groot’s tones. Diesel is just as effective as he was when he voiced the titular Iron Giant back in 1999, also a character of few words.

The final piece of the group is Drax the Destroyer, a great Dave Bautista, who is driven by vengeance for his wife and daughter. Ronan killed them. Money is the group’s main drive, but Groot seems like he’s just along for the ride. Their drives make them relatable, and they work so well because they’re an unlikely cast of characters.

The make-up specialists, in special effects and in general, outdo themselves, especially with Dave Bautista, Zoe Saldana, Lee Pace and Karen Gillan. The story’s heart in such a compelling and easy-going film is just astounding. Due to the film’s great visuals, top-notch writing and its ability to surprise its audience, it just has to be seen.

Score100/100