Disturbia – A film review by Daniel Prinn – A film kind of reminiscent of Rear Window; bonus review.

Disturbia

Release Date: April 13, 2007

Director: D.J. Caruso

Stars: Shia LaBeouf, David Morse, Carrie-Anne Moss

Runtime: 105 min

Tagline: Every killer lives next door to someone.

A lot of people say this flick is like Hitchcock’s Rear Window, but when I was watching that film – I didn’t think of this one once. Well, after thinking about it; there are definitely some reminiscent themes, but it does posses new themes as well (like the teen romance thing), and the suspected killer in this film is much more haunting than the suspected killer of Rear Window (as in Rear Window, the suspected killer only has few lines of dialogue). If compared, R.W. is most definitely the more original piece, but for entertainment value I’d say they’re near in the same league, as this has a most interesting modern touch to it. They are both special in their own ways.

After Kale (Shia LaBeouf)  loses his father, he has become emotionally unstable. A year later, when there is an incident at school, it lands Kale under a court-ordered house arrest. When Kale is running out of ideas of things to do, he resorts to spying on the neighbours – and takes a special interest in a neighbour, Robert Turner (David Morse), whom he begins to suspect of being a serial killer.

The originality of the film isn’t the best, as a lot of the things of the film have been done before, but it really is a great thriller. The thrills and scares are big, and it is thoroughly entertaining and too has its fair share of comical moments. The cast really does an incredible job, from the young acting talents to the great performances by David Morse and Carrie-Anne Moss. Also, as occasionally predictable as the film may be, I was still thoroughly entertained by it all.

The film stars Shia LaBeouf, David Morse, Carrie-Anne Moss, Sarah Roemer, Aaron Yoo, Jose Pablo Cantillo, and Matt Craven, with Viola Davis.

I might be overselling the film so I guess I’ll say this, it gets predictable at times and the pacing feels off in some areas, so just don’t expect Oscar gold, but I think it’s great for a watch, it’s quality entertainment.

The character development of the film is really grand, and I really like the plot as well. It’s one of my favourite thrillers (well it is definitely one of the films that pop into my head first, as it was my first thriller/horror experience in a theatre); but not for its terms of originality, but for its pure entertainment value.

 90/100

Rear Window – A Film Review by Daniel Prinn – Pure entertainment!

 

Rear Window

Release Date: August 1, 1954

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Stars: James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey

Runtime: 112 min

Tagline: Through his rear window and the eye of his powerful camera he watched a great city tell on itself, expose its cheating ways…and Murder!

 

Alfred Hitchcock is a really great filmmaker, making greats such as this, Psycho, The 39 Steps (which I haven’t seen, admittedly, but I’ve heard great things about it) The Birds, and Rope, to name a few.

It’s a rather simple film with a simple, great and effective plot, which just keeps you on edge when it really gets into the story.

L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies is a photographer who hurt his leg and has to stay at his apartment and is wheelchair bound for a while. To pass some time, he starts spying on the neighbours. When he notices some peculiar behaviour, he wonders if a woman across the way has been murdered – which leads himself into a mystery that he must attempt to solve with the help of an investigator, his gal, and his nurse.

It’s really one heck of a suspenseful ride and I really enjoyed it. I haven’t had this much of a great time with a film of only few sets since 12 Angry Men. The beginning was moderately slow because it was only just starting to build up the suspense, but it is still interesting, and when it really got into the story it really is engaging and has pleasant twists and turns and is one heck of an entertaining and suspenseful experience.

James Stewart delivers a usual great performance as Jefferies (he is really one fine old-time actor that I have really grown to love) and the film also stars Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter and Raymond Burr.

It isn’t my favourite Hitchcock film (that would be Psycho), but it is truly worthy of a close second, the suspense hardly stops.

 90/100