Rear Window – A Film Review by Daniel Prinn – Pure entertainment!

 

Rear Window

Release Date: August 1, 1954

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Stars: James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey

Runtime: 112 min

Tagline: Through his rear window and the eye of his powerful camera he watched a great city tell on itself, expose its cheating ways…and Murder!

 

Alfred Hitchcock is a really great filmmaker, making greats such as this, Psycho, The 39 Steps (which I haven’t seen, admittedly, but I’ve heard great things about it) The Birds, and Rope, to name a few.

It’s a rather simple film with a simple, great and effective plot, which just keeps you on edge when it really gets into the story.

L.B. “Jeff” Jefferies is a photographer who hurt his leg and has to stay at his apartment and is wheelchair bound for a while. To pass some time, he starts spying on the neighbours. When he notices some peculiar behaviour, he wonders if a woman across the way has been murdered – which leads himself into a mystery that he must attempt to solve with the help of an investigator, his gal, and his nurse.

It’s really one heck of a suspenseful ride and I really enjoyed it. I haven’t had this much of a great time with a film of only few sets since 12 Angry Men. The beginning was moderately slow because it was only just starting to build up the suspense, but it is still interesting, and when it really got into the story it really is engaging and has pleasant twists and turns and is one heck of an entertaining and suspenseful experience.

James Stewart delivers a usual great performance as Jefferies (he is really one fine old-time actor that I have really grown to love) and the film also stars Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter and Raymond Burr.

It isn’t my favourite Hitchcock film (that would be Psycho), but it is truly worthy of a close second, the suspense hardly stops.

 90/100

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The Birds – A Film Review by Daniel Prinn – Ahhhh, scary birds!

The Birds

Release Date: May 30, 1963

Director: Alfred Hitchcock

Stars: Rod Taylor, Tippi Hedren, Suzanne Pleshette

Runtime: 119 min

Tagline: Suspense and shock beyond anything you have seen or imagined!

It’s a pretty good Hitchcock horror/suspense film.

A wealthy San Francisco woman follows a potential boyfriend to a small North Californian town where things soon start to turn nightmarish after birds of all kinds attack the small town with increasing numbers and drastic viciousness.

It really is suspenseful, but some of it can get a little ridiculous and is laughable at times, when it isn’t supposed to be. It’s somewhat flawed and was probably much scarier in its day and has some very intense sequences. It really is an original piece of work, and has such an effectively simple plot.

It’s generally memorable, and is a really great Hitchcock experience, but I don’t think I’ll return to it soon. Hedren delivers a good performance, as well of a performance she could give while being attacked by birds. The character development is actually very efficient, and they are generally likeable; and unlike the horror film characters of today (where for the annoying characters, you either wish they get killed off, cheer for their deaths and they eventually laugh your asses off when they get killed), you may actually be upset if a character here were butchered off by some hungry birds.

While some of the birds and sets feel so fake they took away from my enjoyment a little, the performances feel pretty genuine. I wouldn’t hate a remake of this one, as maybe they could throw in some better effects, and maybe even make it scarier with a modern touch.

Watch it if you like old suspense films, it isn’t a waste of time at all. It isn’t my favourite Hitchcock film, but really is quite an enjoyable experience.

 80/100